PROJECTS > Over and Over Again (2012)

Over and Over Again
Installation shot
BOLT Project Space, Chicago
2012
Over and Over Again
Installation shot
BOLT Project Space
2012
All We Are is Dust in the Wind
Found magazines and Scotch tape
39.5" in diameter
2012
All We Are is Dust in the Wind
Found magazines and Scotch tape
Detail
2012
Black Hole
Cardstock and scotch tape
39.5" in diameter
2012
Black Hole
Cardstock and scotch tape
39.5" in diameter
2012
Black Hole
Cardstock and scotch tape
Detail
2012
Over and Over Again
Installation shot
2012
Hold on to This Feeling (SPOILER ALERT)
Video Projection
8:04 minutes
2012
Solace Supercut
Video loop
5:07 minutes
2012
Stairway to Heaven
Found magazines and Scotch tape
Detail
2012
Stairway to Heaven
Found magazines and Scotch tape
Detail
2012
Stairway to Heaven
Found magazines and Scotch tape
Detail
Over and Over Again
Installation shot
2012
Wage Job (Endless Column)
Flatware, napkins and napkin bands
132” x 9” x 9”
2012
Wage Job (Endless Column)
Flatware, napkins and napkin bands
Detail
2012
Wage Job (Endless Column)
Flatware, napkins and napkin bands
Detail
2012
Tami and Eric Taylor
Handmade cross-stitch embroidery
18" x 31”
Tami and Eric Taylor
Handmade cross-stitch embroidery
Detail
2012
Tami and Eric Taylor
Handmade cross-stitch embroidery
Detail
2012

Over and Over Again (2012)
Working in a combination of digital and handmade media, Stacia Yeapanis explores the emotional and existential significance of repetition in daily life. She uses the conceptual strategies of accumulation, collection, appropriation and remix, because these strategies are inherently connected to existential methods of meaning-making. The collection and accumulation of ubiquitous materials emphasizes time and the endurance required to exist from moment to moment. Appropriation and remix reveal the ways we choose to make our lives meaningful, even when we didn’t choose the circumstances in which we live. The endless repetition of simple, unskilled tasks evokes the spiritual predicament of Sisyphus, who, because he tried to evade Death, was condemned to roll a boulder up a hill for eternity. His existence seems futile. The boulder will always roll back down the hill. He will always roll it back up again. But, like us, his only option to avoid suffering is to decide that his task is meaningful.

This project is partially supported by a Community Arts Assistance Program grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events and the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency.